Parole In Place

Special Parole Consideration for Spouses, Parents, Sons, and Daughters of Active Duty Members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Individuals in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, or Individuals Who (Whether Still Living or Deceased) Previously Served on Active Duty in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve and Were Not Dishonorably Discharged.

The decision whether to grant parole under INA §212(d)(5)(A) is discretionary. Generally, USCIS grants parole in place only sparingly. The fact that the individual is a spouse, parent, son, or daughter of an Active Duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces, an individual in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, or an individual who previously served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve (if the former service member was not dishonorably discharged and either is living or died while the family member was residing in the United States), however, ordinarily weighs heavily in favor of parole in place. Absent a criminal conviction or other serious adverse factors, parole in place would generally be an appropriate exercise of discretion for such an individual. If USCIS decides to grant parole in that situation, the parole should be authorized in one-year increments, with extensions of parole as appropriate. To request parole, the applicant must submit to the director of the USCIS office with jurisdiction over the applicant's place of residence the following:

  • Completed Form I-31, Application for Travel Document. Form I-131 may be filed without fee, per 8 CFR 103.7(d));
  • Evidence of the family relationship (this may include proof of filing a petition in certain cases – see AFM 21.1(c)(3) below);
  • Evidence that the aplicant's family member is an Active Duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces, individual in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, or an individual who (whether still living or deceased) previously served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve or the Ready Reserve such as a photocopy of both the front and back of the service member's military identification card (DD Form 1173) (in the case of family members of veterans (whether still living or deceased), the service member must not have received a dishonorable discharge upon separation from the military)
  • In the case of surviving family members, proof of residence in the United States at the time of the service member’s death;
  • Two identical, color, passport style photographs; and
  • Evidence of any additional favorable discretionary factors that the requestor wishes considered.

Individuals who have obtained parole in place are eligible to apply for work authorization for the period of parole if they can demonstrate economic necessity.

Parole in place may be granted only to individuals who are present without admission and are therefore applicants for admission. Individuals who were admitted to the United States but are currently present in the United States beyond their periods of authorized stay are not eligible for parole in place, as they are no longer applicants for admission.

Parole in place is a great avenue for individuals who qualify for an immediate visa application but entered without inspection. A grant of Parole in Place places the individual in a position as if he or she entered with permission, therefore, making them eligible to adjust status to that of a permanent resident in the United States.